Bekämpning av myggor med GMO-teknik

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Tryggve
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Re: Bekämpning av myggor med GMO-teknik

Inlägg av Tryggve » tor 16 nov 2017, 10:30

En annan intressant kommentar är att i exemplet i Burkina Faso så verkar myggorna delvis ha anpassat sig till att människorna använder myggnät om natten: de har börjat bli aktiva i skymningen, innan människorna är inomhus.

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Re: Bekämpning av myggor med GMO-teknik

Inlägg av Tryggve » tor 16 nov 2017, 10:37

Ett annat sätt att använda GMO-teknik är att göra myggorna mer resistenta mot virusinfektionen.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 141301.htm

Det finns ju även biologiska metoder att bekämpa infektioner, som sägs i dokumentären. Bakterien Wolbachia kan användas.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolbachia ... infections

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Re: Bekämpning av myggor med GMO-teknik

Inlägg av Tryggve » lör 20 okt 2018, 08:00

Nu inleds ett projekt i Burikina Faso med myggbekämpning.

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-afric ... quitoes-in

https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... irst-time/
The government of Burkina Faso granted scientists permission to release genetically engineered mosquitoes anytime this year or next, researchers announced Wednesday. It’s a key step in the broader efforts to use bioengineering to eliminate malaria in the region.

The release, which scientists are hoping to execute this month, will be the first time that any genetically engineered animal is released into the wild in Africa. While these particular mosquitoes won’t have any mutations related to malaria transmission, researchers are hoping their release, and the work that led up to it, will help improve the perception of the research and trust in the science among regulators and locals alike. It will also inform future releases.

Teams in three African countries—Burkina Faso, Mali, and Uganda—are building the groundwork to eventually let loose “gene drive” mosquitoes, which would contain a mutation that would significantly and quickly reduce the mosquito population. Genetically engineered mosquitoes have already been released in places like Brazil and the Cayman Islands, though animals with gene drives have never been released in the wild.

In Africa, the project’s success depends on more than just the science of genetic engineering. The people who live in the areas where the mosquitoes will be released must give their consent, researchers must staff and maintain labs to work with genetically modified animals, and regulators must accept the new technology. The impending release of these mosquitoes serves as a stress test for the whole system.

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